About Somali Public Agenda (SPA)

Somali Public Agenda is a non-partisan and non-profit public policy and administration research organization based in Mogadishu. Its aim is to advance understanding and improvement of public administration and public services in Somalia through evidence-based research and analysis.

At Somali Public Agenda, we believe that all Somalis deserve better public services including access to affordable education, healthcare, housing, security and justice delivered via transparent and accountable authorities.

Research Reports

This study examines district council formation (DCF) in three FMSs; Southwest, Hirshabelle, and Galmudug. In particular, it zooms in on the current status of the District Council Formation (DCF) at the FMSs, hindrances that the DCF process has faced in the districts where the process was implemented; obstacles underlying the functionality of the formed DCs; the ex/inclusivity of the process; and the challenges that hampered the launching and/ or implementation of the DCF process in the main accessible districts in the three FMSs.

This study explores the prospects and challenges for public participation in politics in Somalia. It aims to identify how Somali authorities, civil society, international actors and other stakeholders can contribute to increasing the participation of ordinary Somalis in the political processes in their country. To that end, politicians, a range of non-governmental actors and the wider citizenry were interviewed for this report.

This report considers the priorities and experiences of displacement-affected communities. It further discusses the durable solutions administrative structures, policies and implementation in two federal member states, namely Jubaland and South West, particularly in Kismayo and Afgoye.

Latest SPA Briefs, Policy Papers & Commentaries

This brief analyses the Adoption Procedure for the Constitutional Amendment and the actors who opposed it. It explores ways that civil society can contribute to and influence the constitutional review process and concludes with several policy considerations. These include the suggestions that the Parliamentary Oversight Committee (OC) and ICRIC engage multiple stakeholders; that the federal government engages and involves other political stakeholders; and that civil society engages policymakers and citizens in the constitutional review process.

Programmes and Centers

Public Agenda Forum

SPA Policy Lab

Center for Learning and Development